Career Learning for Adult Self-Sufficiency (CLASS)

Back to College – It’s quite elementary

Posted by Youth Services - On September 07, 2010 (EST)

In the September 2010 Bureau of Labor Statics “Spotlight on Statistics Back to College” report states:

 

“All of the increase in employment over the past two decades has been among workers who have taken at least some college classes or who have associate or bachelor's degrees—and mostly among workers with bachelor's degrees… In contrast, the number of employed people with only a high school diploma or without a high school diploma has remained steady or decreased.”

 

The spotlight has charts and graphs which make a clear correlation between college education and earnings.

 

So, is it that simple?  What about the hardest to serve young people?  How can we assist them with going AND Staying in college so they too may benefit?



User Comments (6)
On September 07, 2010  Maisha Meminger said:
This is a great report! However, it's not that simple-- many of our youth don't have the support or guidance to make the successful transition. DYS is working on a guide with Dept. of Education-- We hope it will provide some guidelines for youth who have disconnected from school to get them back on track toward a college education.


On September 07, 2010  Catherine Heath said:
The Federal Chafee Education and Training Voucher program provides up to $5,000 a year per youth to help young adults who "aged out" of foster care attend college or other post-secondary education. States awarded over 16,000 vouchers last year. I agree with you Maisha, most youth need support and guidance and just financial assistance might not be enough to help youth attend a program or go to college. We have several States who work with colleges and universities to help these youth with what seems like simple activites. Without a support system in place and someone to turn to, even simple activities can be a challenge.


On September 07, 2010  Catherine Heath said:
The Federal Chafee Education and Training Voucher program provides up to $5,000 a year per youth to help young adults who "aged out" of foster care attend college or other post-secondary education. States awarded over 16,000 vouchers last year. I agree with you Maisha, most youth need support and guidance and just financial assistance might not be enough to help youth attend a program or go to college. We have several States who work with colleges and universities to help these youth with what seems like simple activites. Without a support system in place and someone to turn to, even simple activities can be a challenge.


On September 07, 2010  Catherine Heath said:
The Federal Chafee Education and Training Voucher program provides up to $5,000 a year per youth to help young adults who "aged out" of foster care attend college or other post-secondary education. States awarded over 16,000 vouchers last year. I agree with you Maisha, most youth need support and guidance and just financial assistance might not be enough to help youth attend a program or go to college. We have several States who work with colleges and universities to help these youth with what seems like simple activites. Without a support system in place and someone to turn to, even simple activities can be a challenge.


On September 08, 2010  Phyllis Richardson said:
I also agree with Maisha, some of our youth need help and support and especially guidance. Youth who attend High Schools need to have counselors who can help give them the guidance, financial assistance and help deciding on what classes are needed to help aide them into a college program. Training programs are good for the Federal Government, but what about the High Schools who need to have training programs to help youth attend college.


On September 14, 2010  Mallery V. Johnson said:
It seems that the few who have commented on this blog agree on what is needed: guidance, fiancial asistance, and partnering with colleges and universities to name a few. This is what was happening in my schools at least through the seventies. It worked. Why was it eliminated? What will it take to get it back? The Urban Prep charter school,located in the city’s tough Englewood neighborhood has produced a very different statistic. In March, the school, which is made up of young African-American men, announced that all 107 students in its first graduating class have been accepted to four-year colleges. Just 4 percent of those seniors were reading at grade level as freshmen. If we were to replicate what this school did; and we know it can be done, this is the proof. We are doing great things for some youth; but there are just as many being left behind.



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Modified On : September 07, 2010
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